The Vicomte de Bragelonne

Couverture
Oxford University Press, 1995 - 738 pages
The Vicomte de Bragelonne opens an epic adventure which continues with Louise de La Valli re and reaches its climax in The Man in the Iron Mask. This new edition of the classic translation presents a key episode in the Musketeers saga, fully annotated and with an introduction by a leading Dumas scholar.
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Avis des utilisateurs

5 étoiles
1
4 étoiles
4
3 étoiles
2
2 étoiles
1
1 étoile
0

LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - Lukerik - LibraryThing

This is more Twenty Years After than Three Musketeers. As it's only the first part of a long novel it's hard to judge whether the varied events will be drawn into anything resembling a coherent plot ... Consulter l'avis complet

LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - lkernagh - LibraryThing

Okay, this was not the swashbuckling adventures of The Three Musketeers. Not by a long shot. Given that so many of the characters in this one are the next generation, so to speak, I was hopeful for ... Consulter l'avis complet

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (1995)

After an idle youth, Alexandre Dumas went to Paris and spent some years writing. A volume of short stories and some farces were his only productions until 1927, when his play Henri III (1829) became a success and made him famous. It was as a storyteller rather than a playwright, however, that Dumas gained enduring success. Perhaps the most broadly popular of French romantic novelists, Dumas published some 1,200 volumes during his lifetime. These were not all written by him, however, but were the works of a body of collaborators known as "Dumas & Co." Some of his best works were plagiarized. For example, The Three Musketeers (1844) was taken from the Memoirs of Artagnan by an eighteenth-century writer, and The Count of Monte Cristo (1845) from Penchet's A Diamond and a Vengeance. At the end of his life, drained of money and sapped by his work, Dumas left Paris and went to live at his son's villa, where he remained until his death.

Informations bibliographiques