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THE

PRINCIPLES

OF

FRENCH GRAMMA R,

WITH

NUMEROUS EXERCISES

for the use of Schools and of Private Students.

BY JULES CARON, M. E. I. S.,
Teacher of the French Language and Literature in the Edinburgh

Philosophical Institution, &c.

EDINBURGH :
OLIVER & BOYD, TWEEDDALE COURT.

AGENTS IN LONDON,
SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, & CO.

1853.

[Price Two Shillings bound.)

303.c.25.

PRINTED BY OLIVER AND BOYD, TWEEDDALE COURT, HIGH STREET, EDINBURGH.

PREFACE.

In the following pages great pains have been taken to explain the Principles of French Grammar clearly and intelligibly, by addressing as much as possible both the eye and the understanding. With this view, use has been made of Tables, a peculiar arrangement, and a simple phraseology.

The Tables have neither been unnecessarily multiplied nor made to represent too many things at a time, whilst the division and order of the subject will relieve the attention, and a certain uniformity of expression in Rules almost analogous will assist in making the differences between them more apparent.

It is confidently expected that some improvements on other grammars will be found in this Work, and more particularly under the heads of the Article, Pronouns, and Verbs.

The Article has been presented in its various forms, with the immediate application of each by means of an Exercise. Exercises have been appended to every Rule or important Remark, in order to prevent confusion in the mind of the learner, and to secure the practical knowledge of the Principles at the same time.

As Pronouns form a prominent feature of the French language, every care has been taken in their arrangement,

and in the explanation of their meaning and use. Some important Remarks have been introduced in that chapter rather than in the Syntax, to render the subject at first more intelligible and complete.

The study of the Verbs will be facilitated by a simple appellation of the Tenses, and by two Tables—one for the Formation of Tenses, the other for the more common terminations of French Verbs.

Irregular Verbs are disposed in such an order as to be easily learned, and their irregularities readily perceived. In pointing out the latter, the formation of the tenses has been kept in view, and only the irregularities of Primitive tenses have been marked in italics, when the Derivative tenses were formed regularly from them.

A Table of Irregular and Defective Verbs is placed at the end of the book, with references to their paradigms, and another at the beginning, to serve as an Index to every part of the Grammar.

It is confidently hoped that the Work will prove useful to beginners, and not without advantage to more advanced pupils.

EDINBURGH, 136 GEORGE STREET,

June 1853.

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