Slaves, Women & Homosexuals: Exploring the Hermeneutics of Cultural Analysis

Couverture
InterVarsity Press, 30 mai 2001 - 301 pages
In Slaves, Women & Homosexuals William J. Webb tackles some of the most complex and controversial issues that have challenged the Christian church--and still do. He leads you through the maze of interpretation that has historically surrounded understanding of slaves, women and homosexuals, and he evaluates various approaches to these and other biblical-ethical teachings. Throughout, Webb attempts to "work out the hermeneutics involved in distinguishing that which is merely cultural in Scripture from that which is timeless" (Craig A. Evans). By the conclusion, Webb has introduced and developed a "redemptive hermeneutic" that can be applied to many issues that cause similar dilemmas. Darrel L. Bock writes in the foreword to Webb's work, "His goal is not only to discuss how these groups are to be seen in light of Scriptures but to make a case for a specific hermeneutical approach to reading these texts. . . . This book not only advances a discussion of the topics, but it also takes a markedly new direction toward establishing common ground where possible, potentially breaking down certain walls of hostility within the evangelical community."
 

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Avis d'utilisateur  - Tower_Bob - www.librarything.com

A very nice try, but the argument put forth just seems contrived to me. It not that the author and I would probably disagree very much about the issues debated in this book, it's that we would probably have to have a much deeper debate about biblical inspiration. Consulter l'avis complet

LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - aevaughn - LibraryThing

I found a good deal of value in his redemptive-movement hermeneutic. This method of interpretation involves comparing the biblical text to culture of the original recipients, among other things. I ... Consulter l'avis complet

Table des matières

V
21
VI
30
VII
67
VIII
71
IX
73
X
83
XI
91
XII
105
XXI
179
XXII
185
XXIII
192
XXIV
201
XXV
207
XXVI
209
XXVII
221
XXVIII
236

XIII
110
XIV
123
XV
134
XVI
145
XVII
152
XVIII
157
XIX
162
XX
172
XXIX
245
XXX
257
XXXI
263
XXXII
269
XXXIII
274
XXXIV
279
XXXV
293
Droits d'auteur

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 14 - Remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God. On it you shall not do any work...
Page 14 - Whoever sheds the blood of man, by man shall his blood be shed; for God made man in his own image.
Page 15 - Is any one of you sick? He should call the elders of the church to pray over him and anoint him with oil in the name of the Lord.

À propos de l'auteur (2001)

William Webb is an adjunct professor of New Testament/Biblical Studies at Tyndale Seminary in Toronto, Ontario. He has also written Returning Home: New Covenant and Second Exodus as the Context for 2 Corinthians 6:14--7:1 (Sheffield) and Slaves, Women and Homosexuals (InterVarsity Press).

Darrell L. Bock (Ph.D., Aberdeen) is research professor of New Testament studies and professor of spiritual development and culture at Dallas Theological Seminary in Dallas, Texas. He has written the monograph Blasphemy and Exaltation in Judaism and the Final Examination of Jesus and volumes on Luke in both the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament and the IVP New Testament Commentary Series. Bock is a past president of the Evangelical Theological Society. He serves as a corresponding editor for Christianity Today, and he has published articles in Los Angeles Times and the Dallas Morning News.

Informations bibliographiques