The History of England: From the Revolution in 1688, to the Death of George II. Designed as a Continuation of Hume, Volume 1

Couverture
J.F. Dove For Baynes, 1822
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Table des matières

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 430 - An act for the further security of his Majesty's person and the succession of the crown in the Protestant line, and for extinguishing the hopes of the pretended Prince of Wales, and all other pretenders, and their open and secret abettors...
Page 10 - Will you. to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel, and the Protestant reformed religion established by the law? And will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them?
Page 381 - That no person who has an office or place of profit under the King, or receives a pension from the crown, shall be capable of serving as a member of the house of commons.
Page 13 - Protestant Subjects dissenting from the Church of England from the Penalties of certain Laws...
Page 10 - Will you solemnly promise and swear to govern the people of this United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and the dominions thereto belonging, according to the statutes in parliament agreed on, and the respective laws and customs of the same? King. I solemnly promise so to do.
Page 136 - The laws enacted in this session were these : an act for abrogating the oath of supremacy in Ireland, and appointing other oaths...
Page 357 - Papist shall be capable of purchasing any lands, tenements, or hereditaments, either in his own name, or in the name of any other person in trust for him.
Page 381 - That from and after the time that the further limitation by this act shall take effect, all matters and things relating to the wellgoverning of this kingdom, which are properly cognizable in the privy council by the laws and customs of this realm, shall be transacted there, and all resolutions taken thereupon shall be signed by such of the privy council as shall advise and consent to the same.
Page 421 - He seemed to be in a fair way of recovering till the first day of March, when his knee appeared to be inflamed, with great pain and weakness. Next day he granted a commission under the great seal to several peers, for passing the bills to which both houses of parliament had agreed ; namely, the act of attainder against the pretended prince of Wales, and another in favour of the quakers, enacting, that their solemn affirmation and declaration should be accepted instead of an oath in the usual form.
Page 401 - It was concluded in these words : " For Englishmen are no more to be slaves to parliaments than to kings — our name is Legion, and we are many.

Informations bibliographiques