Sense and Sensibility: A Novel

Couverture
R. Bentley, 1833 - 331 pages
 

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Pages sélectionnées

Table des matières

I
xvii
II
xvii
III
10
IV
15
V
20
VI
23
VII
26
VIII
30
XXVI
134
XXVII
141
XXVIII
148
XXIX
152
XXX
163
XXXI
171
XXXII
181
XXXIII
188

IX
33
X
39
XI
45
XII
49
XIII
53
XIV
60
XV
64
XVI
71
XVII
76
XVIII
81
XIX
86
XX
94
XXI
100
XXII
108
XXIII
117
XXIV
123
XXV
129
XXXIV
197
XXXV
204
XXXVI
211
XXXVII
220
XXXVIII
232
XXXIX
240
XL
245
XLI
252
XLII
259
XLIII
264
XLIV
274
XLV
288
XLVI
294
XLVII
302
XLVIII
309
XLIX
313
L
324

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Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 83 - I like a fine prospect, but not on picturesque principles. I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles, or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower — and a troop of tidy, happy villagers please me better than the finest banditti in the world.
Page 150 - Marianne, as if wishing to avoid her eye, and determined not to observe her attitude, inquired in a hurried manner after Mrs. Dashwood, and asked how long they had been in town. Elinor was robbed of all presence of mind by such an address, and was unable to say a word. But the feelings of her sister were instantly expressed. Her face was crimsoned over, and she exclaimed in a voice of the greatest emotion, " Good God ! Willoughby, what is the meaning of this ? Have you not received my letters ? Will...
Page 43 - Perhaps she pitied and esteemed him the more because he was slighted by Willoughby and Marianne , who, prejudiced against him for being neither lively nor young, seemed resolved to undervalue his merits. "Brandon is just the kind of man...
Page 327 - Mrs. Ferrars to his choice, and re-established him completely in her favour. The whole of Lucy's behaviour in the affair, and the prosperity which crowned it, therefore, may be held forth as a most encouraging instance of what an earnest, an unceasing attention to self-interest, however its progress may be apparently obstructed, will do in securing every advantage of fortune, with no other sacrifice than that of time and conscience.
Page 80 - to be guided wholly by the opinion of other people. I thought our judgments were given us merely to be subservient to those of our neighbours. This has always been your doctrine, I am sure." "No, Marianne, never. My doctrine has never aimed at the subjection of the understanding. All I have ever attempted to influence has been the behaviour. You must not confound my meaning. I am guilty, I confess, of having often wished you to treat our acquaintance in general with greater attention; but when have...
Page vii - ... separately good. Their assemblage produced an unrivalled expression of that cheerfulness, sensibility, and benevolence, which were her real characteristics. Her complexion was of the finest texture. It might with truth be said, that her eloquent blood spoke through her modest cheek. Her voice was extremely sweet. She delivered herself with fluency and precision. Indeed she was formed for elegant and rational society, excelling in conversation as much as in composition.
Page 150 - He could not then avoid it, but her touch seemed painful to him, and he held her hand only for a moment. During all this time he was evidently struggling for composure. Elinor watched his countenance, and saw its expression becoming more tranquil. After a moment's pause, he spoke with calmness. ' I did myself the honour of calling in Berkeley Street last Tuesday, and very much regretted that I was not fortunate enough to find yourselves and Mrs. Jennings at home. My card was not lost, I hope.

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