Eugene Onegin: A Novel in Verse

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Penguin Books Limited, 4 sept. 2008 - 244 pages
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'Blest who betimes has left life's revel, whose wine-filled glass he has not drained'

Tired of the glitter and glamour of St Petersberg society, aristocratic dandy Eugene Onegin retreats to the country estate he has recently inherited. With the arrival of the idealistic young poet Vladimir Lendsky he begins an unlikely friendship, while the poet welcomes this urbane addition to his small social circle - and is happy to introduce Onegin to his fiancée Olga and her family. But when Olga's sister Tatiana becomes infatuated with Onegin, his cold rejection of her love brings about a tragedy that engulfs them all. Unfolding with dream-like inevitability and dazzling energy, Pushkin's tragic poem is one of the great works of Russian literature.

In this new translation, Stanley Mitchell captures the cadences and lightness of the original poem, and discusses in his introduction Pushkin's life, writings and politics, as well as previous translations of the work. This edition also contains a chronology and suggested further reading.

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Review: Eugene Onegin: A Novel in Verse by Alexander Pushkin

Avis d'utilisateur  - Goodreads

Loved it! Lots of fun. Consulter l'avis complet

Review: Eugene Onegin: A Novel in Verse by Alexander Pushkin

Avis d'utilisateur  - Goodreads

This is "the" translation to read. The accuracy if the translation while keeping the integrity of the rhyme is quite impressive. For opera fans worth finding the video of a performance. Consulter l'avis complet

À propos de l'auteur (2008)

Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin was born in Moscow in 1799. He was liberally educated and left school in 1817. Given a sinecure in the Foreign Office, he spent three dissipated years in St Petersburg writing light, erotic and highly polished verse. He flirted with several pre-Decembrist societies, composing the mildly revolutionary verses which led to his disgrace and exile in 1820. After traveling through the Caucasus and the Crimea, he was sent to Bessarabia, where he wrote The Captive of the Caucasus and The Fountain at Bakhchisaray, and began Eugene Onegin. His work took an increasingly serious turn during the last year of his southern exile, in Odessa.

In 1824 he was transferred to his parents' estate at Mikhaylovskoe in north-west Russia, where he spent two solitary but fruitful years during which he wrote his historical drama Boris Godunov, continued Eugene Onegin and finished The Gipsies. After the failure of the Decembrist Revolt in 1825 and the succession of a new tsar, Pushkin was granted conditional freedom in 1826. During the next three years he wandered restlessly between St Petersburg and Moscow. He wrote an epic poem, Poltava, but little else.

In 1829 he went with the Russian army to Transcaucasia, and the following year, stranded by a cholera outbreak at the small family estate of Boldino, he wrote his experimental Little Tragedies in blan

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