A History of the English Church: Hutton, W. H. The English church from the accession of Charles I to the death of Anne (1625-1714)

Couverture
William Richard Wood Stephens, William Hunt
Macmillan and Company, Limited, 1903
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Page 89 - God, promise, vow and protest to maintain and defend, as far as lawfully I may, with my Life, Power and Estate the true Reformed Protestant Religion, expressed in the Doctrine of the Church of England, against all Popery and Popish Innovations within this Realm, contrary to the same Doctrine...
Page 126 - II. That we shall in like manner, without respect of persons, endeavour the extirpation of popery, prelacy (that is, Church government by archbishops, bishops, their chancellors and commissaries, deans, deans and chapters, archdeacons, and all other ecclesiastical officers depending on that hierarchy...
Page 352 - Sat pining all his life there, did scarce trust His own hands with the dust, Yet would not place one piece above, but lives In fear of thieves.
Page 81 - And all these things I do plainly and sincerely acknowledge and swear, according to these express words by me spoken, and according to the plain and common sense and understanding of the same words, without any equivocation or mental evasion or secret reservation whatsoever : And I do make this recognition and acknowledgment heartily, willingly, and truly, upon the true faith of a Christian, So help me God.
Page 175 - ... a liberty to tender consciences, and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matter of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Page 321 - Wears but a gayer livery at best. When dinner calls, the implement must wait With holy words to consecrate the meat; But hold it for a favour seldom known, If he be deign'd the honour to sit down.
Page 149 - And was it fit for them to sit heavy upon others? Is it ingenuous to ask liberty, and not to give it? What greater hypocrisy than for those who were oppressed by the Bishops to become the greatest oppressors themselves, so soon as their yoke was removed...
Page 126 - Archdeacons, and all other ecclesiastical officers depending on that hierarchy), superstition, heresy, schism, profaneness, and whatsoever shall be found to be contrary to sound doctrine and the power of godliness lest we partake in other men's sins, and thereby be in danger to receive of their plagues ; and that the Lord may be one, and His name one in the three kingdoms.
Page 115 - No cruel guard of diligent cares, that keep Crown'd woes awake, as things too wise for sleep : But reverent discipline, and religious fear, And soft obedience, find sweet biding here ; Silence, and sacred rest ; peace, and pure joys...
Page 103 - Whiles his young master lieth o'er his head. Second that he do on no default Ever presume to sit above the salt. Third that he never change his trencher twice. Fourth that he use all common courtesies: Sit bare at meals and one half rise and wait. Last, that he never his...

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