The Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London

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Vols. 1-108 include Proceedings of the society (separately paged, beginning with v. 30)
 

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Page 228 - Seeing every height crowned with its crater, and the boundaries of most of the lava-streams still distinct, we are led to believe that within a period, geologically recent, the unbroken ocean was here spread out. Hence, both in space and time, we seem to be brought somewhat near to that great fact — that mystery of mysteries — the first appearance of new beings on this earth.
Page cii - ... us to propose. no other means than to study in each of them a series of beds comprised between two known and well determined points, to compare their fossils, to seek out the identical species, and to see if these species are distributed according to the same law. If it happens that in the two countries a certain number of systems, characterized by the same fossils, are superimposed in the same order, whatever may be, otherwise, their thickness and the number of physical groups of which they...
Page xxiv - I cannot close this notice of our losses by death," his Address runs, " without adverting to that of one, who though not placed among even the easier classes of society, but who had to earn her daily bread by her labour, yet contributed by her talents and untiring researches in no small degree to our knowledge of the great Enalio-saurians, and other forms of organic life entombed in the vicinity of Lyme Regis . . . .there are those among us in this room who know well...
Page 10 - ... of the obscurity in which the true age of the Orbitolite limestone of Alabama had been involved, it having been considered sometimes as an upper cretaceous group, and at others as intermediate between the cretaceous and the eocene formations. The accompanying section from Claiborne bluff to Bettis's Hill, near Macon in Alabama, may serve to explain the relations which I found to exist between the white limestone group of the south, comprising the successive formations 1, 2, 3, and the overlying...
Page 222 - ... the detritus of augitic rocks and earthy tuff. This sand has filled all the cavities and cancelli that have external openings, but is in no instance consolidated or aggregated together ; it is easily removed from the bones by shaking, or by a soft brush. A very few water-worn pebbles of volcanic rocks were the only extraneous bodies found in the sand : there are no vestiges of shells or mollusca of any kind ; but there is in the collection a small Area imbedded in a sandy clay, and an ammonite...
Page 11 - ... stone, which hardens on exposure to the air, is not divided by lines of stratification, and is for the most part made up of Orbitolites of various sizes, with occasionally a Lunulite and other small corals, with specimens of Pecten Poulsoni. The origin of this limestone like that of our white chalk, the softer varieties of which it much resembles, is I believe due to the decomposition of corals, and like our chalk downs, the surface of the country where it prevails is sometimes marked by the...
Page 223 - ... Its geological structure is with difficulty determined, owing to the primeval forests which fringe the coast ; and where these have been destroyed, by impenetrable thickets of esculent fern. The fundamental rock is everywhere clay-slate, which is frequently traversed by greenstone dykes, as at Fort Nicholson, Queen Charlotte's Sound, and Cloudy Bay.
Page 134 - ... beds. In West Australia the Darling range consists of granite below, covered by metamorphic rocks ; and between it and the sea is a plain composed of tertiary beds. In the colony of North Australia there is a great sandstone plateau, rising about 1800 feet above the sea, and probably of palaeozoic age ; whilst on the immediate shore and round the Gulf of Carpentaria are beds supposed to belong to the tertiary period. Similar formations constitute the substratum of the central desert, in which...
Page lxxi - The mode in which the various minerals occur is highly interesting, as also their connexion with the matter filling veins and fissures in adjoining parts of the same or adjacent rocks, as, for example, the filling of the fissures in the red conglomerate, by the same kind of siliceous matter which entered into the cavities of the igneous rocks of Idal, the layers having, in both cases, adjusted themselves to the surfaces on which they were accumulated. — Sir Henry T. De la Beche's Address, delivered...
Page 217 - London, No. 15, Aug, 1848. IT is not a little remarkable that one of the most interesting palaeontological discoveries of our times, namely, the former existence of a race of colossal Ostrich-like birds in the islands of New Zealand, though made in a British colony, and announced to the scientific world by an eminent British physiologist, has not hitherto been brought under the immediate notice of the Geological Society of London. I therefore consider myself particularly fortunate in having an opportunity,...

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