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OF

THE FRENCH LANGUAGE.

En Four Parts:

1.--INTRODUCTION À LA GRAMMAIRE LIII.-INTRODUCTION À LA CONVERSA-
FRANÇAISE.

TION FAMILIÈRE.
II.-PARTIE FRANÇAISE.

| IV.-SYNTAX.

WITH

A HUNDRED AND FIFTY-SEVEN EXERCISES,

Arranged on a Dew Plan,

AND WITH A SPECIAL VIEW TO ENABLE THE STUDENT

TO SPEAK FRENCH.

BY DR. E. F. CH. RITTER,

Professor of the French Language and Literature in the Islington

Proprietary School.

" MULTUM, NON MULT

LONDON:
FRANCIS AND JOHN RIVINGTON,

ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD AND WATERLOO PLACE.

1844.

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PREFACE.

“En parlant à votre élève soyez clair, simple et naturel; surtout ne prenez jamais vos idées pour les siennes.”

THE Author of this work has conceived his system from observing the manner in which a child learns its mother tongue. The experience of several years has convinced him that success, in teaching children a modern language, depends entirely on the choice of examples and the simplicity of rules.

Far from having adorned his Grammar with the elevated phrases which usually abound in books of this description, and by which children are always wearied and discouraged, he has scrupulously avoided every expression that appeared beyond a pupil's comprehension.

The French part, and more particularly the verbs which form a portion of it, have been arranged on an entirely new plan. The Author's object has been to imprint facts on the memory of his pupils, instead of bewildering them with rules.

Particular attention has been paid to the subject of the irregular verbs, the Author knowing, by experience, that this is a stumbling-block to beginners. The most important part of French, as of every modern language, an introduction to familiar conversation, has been laid down in the Exercises of this portion of his book.

As the Author is of opinion that a pupil who has studied, with the assistance of an experienced master, the first, second, and third part of this work, will be able to make use of a Grammar entirely written in French (such as Lemare's, Boniface's, or GiraultDuvivier's), he has not thought it requisite to give more than a mere abridgement of the Syntax, stating the principal rules, and particularly dwelling on those in which the two languages essentially differ.

London, 25th July, 1844.

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