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Page 391.—1. of fencing. 2. I showed you. 3. adversary. 4. in or out. 5. in this manner. 6. any courage. 7. this will show of what importance we fencing-masters must be. 8. is superior. 9. & 10. softly, Mr. Fencer. 11. you are pretty fellows. 12. leathern stomacher (used by fencing-masters). 13. softly. 14. will drub. 15. pray! 16. will thrash. 17. teach him better manners.

Page 393.—I. what is the matter? 2. even to abusing each other, and wishing to come to blow3. 3. can you thus give way to anger? 4. to abuse us both. 5. ought that to make you angry? 6. silly pedant. 7- arrant schoolmaster. 8. villains! rogues! 9. the deuce take the packsaddled ass! 10. knaves! beggars!

Page 395.—1. adjusting his band. 2. which will cut them up finely. 3. the greatest desire. 4. I am vexed. 5. frightful. 6. does not take my fancy. 7. ethics. 8. morality is of no avail; I will get in a passion as much as I please, when I have a mind. 9. natural philosophy. 10. ignesfatui. 11. bustle. 12. confusion. 13. by bringing the under jaw nearer to the upper. 14. pouting the lips. 15. you were making mouths. 16. you need only. 17. by striking the tip. 18. how angry I am with you!

19. so that being grazed. 20. prettily.

Page 400.—1. trapped out thus. 2. one would think it is carnival here. 3. the house clean. 4. gang. 5. tired out. 6. biaux, a vulgar pronunciation for beaux. 7. are very nimble-tongued. 8. loosen all the bricks, carriaux for carreaux, see 6. 9. advantages. 10. would to heaven I were to be whipped even now. 11. you would be all the better for it. 12. fools. 13. nonsense. 14.there! see what comes by studying. 15. just say. 16. nonsense. 17. ought to send away. 18. fooleries. 19. loobily.

20. deuce take the hussy! 21. managed very well. 22. with whom you have become infatuated. 23. he will take good care not to do so; literally: he will not fail to fail. 24. to wheedle you.

Page 405.—1. you are as genteelly dressed as possible. 2. a proverbial expression, meaning, 'he talks of what gives him pleasure.' 3. put on your hat. 4. get out of debt. 5. a hundred and twenty. 6. milch cow. 7- will drain you to the last farthing. 8. many persons.

Page 408.—1. of noble birth. 2. they spend few words upon it. 3. shake hands. 4. are we descended from St. Louis? 5. understand your drift. 6. but from good citizens. 7. now for slander. 8. tradesman. 9. plague take. 10. she never fails to say so. 11. they are ill-informed people. 12. suitable.

13. beggarly and ill-shaped. 14. silliest booby. 15. are always meddling. 16. should fail through inadvertence. 17- to play at la madame, the name of a game played by children. 18. so great a lady as she is now.

Page 411.—1. your late.

Page 413.— 1. Oh unforeseen misfortune! 2. what business had he in that galley? (This droll exclamation of Géronte has become proverbial.) 3. in the pace of a horse.

Page 420.—1. judgment. 2. his professors always spoke highly to me. 3. by dint of striking the iron, 'persevering.' 4. degrees. 5. to the utmost. 6. thesis, or disputation in philosophy. "J. take the hand. 8. convoler, to marry again; * flew.' 9. (is come) fresh (from college). 10. he will always surpass you in retort.

Page 425.—1. 'uneven.'

Page 427.—1. will not do for you. 2. will fondle. 3. in earnest. 4. bless me!

Page 430.—1. ignorant. 2. present my respects. 3. interpreter. 4. blockhead.

Page 439.—1. just as it happens. 2. I wash my hands of it; i. e. I am not concerned in it. 3. let it be as it may, I shall not care. 4. peace-ofiScer of the ward, quartier (de la ville).

Page 441.—1. why does he take into his head?

Page 442.—1. folding-chair.

Page 446.— 1. to physic. 2. would be very well content with her. 3. shoulder-blade. 4. midrif (diaphragme, muscle trèslarge et fort mince, situé a la base de la poitrine, qu'il sépare d'avec l'abdomen). 5. this indeed is the cause why your daughter is dumb. Voilà ce qui fait que votre fille est muette: this phrase has become a proverbial expression, and is applied to unintelligible and absurd arguments. 6. would that I had such a wellhung tongue!

Page 450.—1. troublesome business. 2. attempt upon my freedom. 3. honesty. 4. safeguard. 5. likely to be so. 6. who have contributed to the Elegant extracts. 7. infinitely obliged. 8. dabble in it. 9. supremely fine.

Page 453.—1. my dear. 2. attendance at court. 3. are not inferior to me. 4. tenderness. 5. by a grenade.

THE END.

TEINTED BY RICHARD AND JOHN E. TAYLOR,
RED LION COURT, FLEET STREET.

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For the assistance of Public Education and Private Study. IHODERM FRENCH SCHOOL-BOOKS,

BY

C. J. DELILLE.

PUBL1SHED BY

WHITTAKER AND CO., AVE-MARIA-LANE, LONDON.

I.

Third Edition, revised and enlarged, 12mo, 5s. 6d. bound,

C. J. DELILLE'S FRENCH CLASS-BOOK,

A NEW THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL

FRENCH GRAMMAR;

CONTAINING NUMEKOUS GRADUATE1) COLLOUU1AL EXERCISES,

On a Plan peculiarly conducive to
THE SPEAKING OF THE FRENCH LANGUAGE.

The Examples, selected from the most distinguished Writers of France, are explained according to the recent decisions of the French Acadcmyand the best Grammarians of the present day.

The Exercises and Dialogues are accompanied by a series of interesting Letters, Practice in commercial Language, &c. &c.

Extrait du rapport fait à la Société Grammaticale De Paris, de

l'ouvrage de M. C. J. Delille: The French Class-Book.

Séance du à juillet, 1836.

"Cet ouvrage, à la fois analytique et synthétique, est une excellente

introduction à l'étude de la langue française: il renferme des principes

clairement exposés et fondés sur l'usage de nos meilleurs écrivains; ainsi

que des exercices de grammaire, de langage et de narration, adaptés

aux besoins usuels de la vie.

(Signé) "ALEX. BONIFACE, "Certifié conforme, "Rapporteur."

"Paris, le S juillet, 1836, "Le secrétaire général,

"Palla."

2 c. j. Delille's Modern French School-books.

II.

A new Edition, \2mo, 2s. Gd.

Dedicated to THE HON. THE COUNCIL OF KING's COLLEGE, IONDON.

LE MANUEL ÉTYMOLOGIQUE;

AN INTERPRETATIVE INDEX OF THE MOST RECURRENT WORDS IN THE FRENCH LANGUAGE,

Exhibiting and Illustrating the Roots of those invariable Parts of Speech called Prepositions, Adverbs, and Conjunctions.

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Extrait du rapport fait à la Société Grammaticale De Paris, du Manuel étymologique de M. C. J. Delille.

Séance du 5 juillet, 1836.

"Cet opuscule fort bien composé comprend l'étymologie et l'interprétation de tous les mots invariables. Plusieurs de ces origines sont vraiment curieuses et dignes de notre attention.

{Signé) "ALEX. BONIFACE, "Certifié conforme, "Rapporteur."

"Paris, le 5 juillet, 1836, "Le secrétaire général,

"palla."

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