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THE RELIGION OF A GENTLEMAN. By Charles F. Dole. New

York: Thomes Y. Crowell & Company, 1900, pp. xvi, 219.

The religion of Mr. Dole is attractive and commands respect. It is the expression of a clear mind and a noble heart. His outlook upon life is sane and sympathetic. His plea for what Burke called the "spirit of the gentleman" is fine. By a gentleman he understands a man "who loves man, who serves man, whose sympathies over-arch the world." And he wants him to have a civilised religion, free from superstition, full of reverence, active in good works. Will the civilised man pray? Mr. Dole answers in the affirmative. But he seems to mean by prayer a quiet meditation in view of the universal life. The need of such moments of spiritual refreshment cannot be too strongly emphasised. Mr. Dole does not discuss the moral influence of public prayer, so strongly condemned by Jesus as a breach of the modesty of the soul, or of the petitioning for things, even spiritual things, from without that can only come by effort from within. The frequent references to the lives of truly great men, and especially the free and reverent use of the life of Jesus, add immeasurably to the value of the little volume. No one will read without comfort the chapter entitled "Memento mori," whatever his views may be in respect to the future. Nothing in the book, however, is so interesting as the glimpses it affords of the inner life of an earnest seeker after truth and a simple follower of the truth he sees.

NATHANIEL SCHMIDT. CORNELL UNIVERSITY.

PROPHETIC IDEAS AND IDEALS. A series of short studies in the

prophetic literature of the Hebrew people. By W. G. Jordan, D. D., Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature in Queen's University, Kingston, Canada. London and New York: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1902, pp. 363.

The aim of this volume is expository rather than critical or apologetic. It gives specimens of popular expositions based upon recent study, but as free as possible from technical discussion. All the prophets except Daniel are represented. Since the second century of our era it has been customary to leave him out of the prophetic canon, and in Hebrew Bibles he is printed in the third collection. The order is chronological, and itself shows that the author is dominated, to a considerable extent, by the views of the critical school. His method is to draw out the leading thought of a certain section, set it forth in its immediate historic meaning, and then to seek for the permanent applications of the truth proclaimed.

The work is done in an admirable spirit, and the book deserves to be read as an example of good sermonizing on the basis of critical study. While nobly urging the Christian ministry to magnify its calling, the author still feels that there was something unique in the ancient prophet, entitling us to use the name only in a secondary sense of our noblest men. This uniqueness

. seems to him “in part to consist in the fact that they were divinely appointed interpreters of a nation's destiny and guides of its life.”

Perhaps the power will return, if it has not already come, when the doctrine of a special divine inspiration and appointment of men in the past, different from and higher than anything possible for men to experience to-day, shall have passed away. The author feels that "our reformers and noblest leaders have come very near” to the position of the prophets and that "it shades off by almost imperceptible degrees into a broader prophetic life which we by divine grace may hope to share,” and urges us to take "the prophets' treatment of social questions as a tonic which will save us from a shallow individualism and a spurious evangelism."

NATHANIEL SCHMIDT. CORNELL UNIVERSITY.

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BOOKS RECEIVED. RECENT TENDENCIES IN Ethics: THREE LECTURES TO CLERGY GIVEN AT

CAMBRIDGE. By W. R. Sorley, M. A., Hon. LL. D. (Edin.) Knightbridge Professor of Moral Philosophy. Edinburgh and London: W. Black

wood & Sons, 1904. Pp. vi, 139. THE PATHWAY TO REALITY: STAGE THE SECOND: Being the Gifford Lec

tures delivered in the University of St. Andrews in the Series of 19031904. By the Right Hon. R. B. Haldane, M. P., LL. D., K. C. London: John Murray, 1904. Pp. xxvii, 275. SELECTIONS FROM THE LITERATURE OF THEISM. Edited, with Introductory and Explanatory Notes, by Alfred Caldecott, M. A. (London), D. D. (Cambridge); Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy, King's College, London; Examiner in Historical Theology in the University of London; Late Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge; and H. R. Mackintosh, M. A., D. Phil. (Edinburgh), Minister of Beechgrove

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United Free Church, Aberdeen. Edinburgh: T. and T. Clark, 1904.

Pp. xiii, 472. THE RELIGION OF THE UNIVERSE. By J. Allanson Picton, M. A. London:

Macmillan & Co., Ltd.; New York: The Macmillan Company, 1904

Pp. x, 380. AUTOBIOGRAPHY. By Alexander Bain, LL. D., Professor of Logic and

English, University of Aberdeen. London, New York, and Bombay:

Longmans, Green & Co., 1904. Pp. xi, 449. DESIDERIUS ERASMUS CONCERNING THE AIM AND METHOD OF EDUCATION.

Cambridge: At the University Press, 1904. Pp. 262. EDUCATION THROUGH THE IMAGINATION. By Margaret McMillan. Lon

don: Swan Sonnenschein & Co., Ltd., 1904. Pp. xiv, 196. A VISION OF THE FUTURE BASED ON THE APPLICATION OF ETHICAL PRIN

CIPLES. By Jane Hume Clapperton. London: Swan Sonnenschein &

Co., Ltd., 1904. Pp. viii, 347. FIRST CONDITIONS OF HUMAN PROSPERITY. By the Hon. R. Russell.

London, New York, and Bombay: Longmans, Green & Co., 1904. Pp.

iv, 156. PROGRESS OR RETROGRESS: A Protest Addressed to the Nations in General

and to England in Particular, Dealing with the So-called “Alien Question,” from the Point of View of Religion, Psychology, and Morals. By

Ch. W. Ronnfeld. London: Printed by Lewinstein & Son, 1904. Pp. 40. THE LICENSING Bill, 1904: THIRTEEN ARTICLES. By Joseph Rowntree

and Arthur Sherwill. York: Doolittle, Fennrik & Co. THE STATE REMEDY FOR PURITY. By a Doctor of Medicine. (An Extract

from "The Elements of Social Science,” with further remarks in 1904). London: Geo. Standring, 1904. (Attributes purity to over-population, and proposes that families should be restricted by law to four children).

Pp. 14. SOME NEGLECTED ASPECTS OF THE FISCAL QUESTION. By John Shanks.

Glasgow: David Bryce & Son, 1904. Pp. 32. The HIBBERT JOURNAL: A QUARTERLY REVIEW OF RELIGION, THEOLOGY,

AND PHILOSOPHY. Vol. II, No. 4, July, 1904. Pp. 649-864. THE ANGLO-RUSSIAN. Vol. VII, Nos. 10, II, 12, and 13: April, May,

June, and July, 1904. Edited by Jaakoff Prelooker. Pp. 811-846. THE INDIAN REVIEW. Vol. V, No. 5: May, 1904. Madras: G. A. Natesan

& Co. Pp. 289-360. THE HUMANITARIAN: THE JOURNAL OF THE HUMANITARIAN LEAGUE

Vol. II, No. 27: May, 1904. Pp. 33-40.

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