The Reformed Presbyterian and Covenanter, Volume 6

Couverture
Myers, Shinkle, 1868
 

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Page 271 - For God hath not appointed us to wrath, but to obtain salvation by our Lord Jesus Christ, who died for us, that, whether we wake or sleep, we should live together with him.
Page 110 - What is the Almighty, that we should serve him? and what profit should we have, if we pray unto him?
Page 288 - God; to comfort all that mourn ; to appoint unto them that mourn in Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that he might be glorified.
Page 81 - The days of our years are threescore years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labor and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away.
Page 110 - And the harp, and the viol, the tabret, and pipe, and wine, are in their feasts but they regard not the work of the Lord, neither consider the operation of his hands.
Page 300 - Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you ? If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy ; for the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are.
Page 81 - It is better to go to the house of mourning, than to go to the house of feasting: for that is the end of all men; and the living will lay it to his heart.
Page 64 - For he hath strengthened the bars of thy gates ; he hath blessed thy children within thee.
Page 15 - What sweetness, what purity in his manners ! what an affecting gracefulness in his delivery ! what sublimity in his maxims ! what profound wisdom in his discourses ! what presence of mind, what subtlety, what truth in his replies!
Page 16 - What prepossession, what blindness must it be to compare the son of Sophronicus to the son of Mary! What an infinite disproportion there is between them ! Socrates dying without pain or ignominy, easily supported his character to the last; and if his death, however easy, had not crowned his life, it might have been doubted whether Socrates, with all his wisdom, was anything more than a vain sophist.

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