The Microscope

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H. Ingram and Company, 1856 - 457 pages
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Page 338 - This is dispensed ; and what surmounts the reach Of human sense I shall delineate so, By likening spiritual to corporal forms, As may express them best ; though what if earth Be but the shadow of heaven, and things therein Each to other like, more than on earth is thought...
Page 180 - ... around. The beauty and novelty of such a scene in the animal kingdom long arrested my attention, but, after twenty-five minutes' of constant observation, I was obliged to withdraw my eye from fatigue, without having seen the torrent for one instant change its direction, or diminish in the slightest degree the rapidity of its course.
Page 451 - Has swept at once th' unbounded scheme of things, Marked their dependence so, and firm accord, As with unfaltering accent to conclude That this availeth nought ? Has any seen The mighty chain of beings, lessening down From Infinite Perfection to the brink Of dreary nothing, desolate abyss!
Page 141 - While sailing a little south of the Plata on one very dark night, the sea presented a wonderful and most beautiful spectacle. There was a fresh breeze, and every part of the surface, which during the day is seen as foam, now glowed with a pale light. The vessel drove before her bows two billows of liquid phosphorus, and in her wake she was followed by a milky train. As far as the eye reached, the crest of every wave was bright, and the sky above the horizon, from the reflected glare of these livid...
Page 176 - Consider their incredible numbers, their universal distribution, their insatiable voracity; and that it is the particles of decaying vegetable and animal bodies which they are appointed to devour and assimilate. Surely we must in some degree be indebted to those ever active invisible scavengers for the salubrity of our atmosphere.
Page 218 - ... had become thin and flattened like a pancake. All communication between the inferior portion of the stomach and the mouth was of course prevented ; yet, instead of emaciating and dying of an atrophy, the animal had availed itself of what...
Page 14 - These foci vary according to the distance of the radiant points. lu every lens the right line perpendicular to the two surfaces is called the axis of the lens, and is seen in the annexed figure ; the point where the axis cuts the surface is called the vertex of the lens.
Page 235 - ... invisible. These animals are of a great variety of shapes and sizes, and in such prodigious numbers, that, in a short time, the whole surface of the rock appears to be alive and in motion. The most common...

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