On the Nature, Properties, and Applications of Steam, and on Steam Navigation: From the 7th Ed. of the Encyclopædia Britannica

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A. and C. Black, 1841 - 378 pages

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Page 31 - ... hours it burst and made a great crack : so that having a way to make my vessels, so that they are strengthened by the force within them, and the one to fill after the other.
Page 209 - Nothing could exceed the surprise and admiration of all who witnessed the experiment. The minds of the most incredulous were changed in a few minutes. Before the boat had made the progress of a quarter of a mile, the greatest unbeliever must have been converted. The man who, while he looked on the expensive machine, thanked his stars that he had more wisdom than to waste his money on such idle schemes, changed the expression of his features as the boat moved from the wharf and gained her speed, and...
Page 330 - It is far from my wish to promulgate to the world that the ridiculous expectations, or rather professions, of the enthusiastic speculist will be realized, and that we shall see them travelling at the rate of 12, 16, 18, or 20 miles an hour, nothing could do more harm towards their adoption, or general improvement, than the promulgation of such nonsense.
Page 227 - A Description and Draught of a new-invented Machine, for carrying Vessels or Ships out of, or into, any Harbour, Port, or River, against Wind and Tide, or in a calm.
Page 210 - SIR, — I arrived this afternoon at four o'clock in the steam boat from Albany. As the success of my experiment gives me great hopes that such boats may be rendered of great importance to my country, to prevent erroneous opinions, and give some satisfaction to the friends of useful improvements, you will have the goodness to publish the following statement...
Page vii - But this superiority was concealed under the most amiable candour, and liberal allowance of merit to every man. Mr. Watt was the first to ascribe to the ingenuity of a friend things which were very often nothing but his own surmises followed out and embodied by another. I am well entitled to say this, and have often experienced it in my own case.
Page 327 - Upon the consideration of the question in every point of view, taking the two lines of road as now forming, and having reference to economy, despatch, safety, and convenience, our opinion is, that if it be resolved to make the Liverpool and Manchester Railway complete at once, so as to accommodate the traffic stated in your instructions, or a quantity approaching to it, the stationary reciprocating system is the best...
Page 209 - Before the boat had made the progress of a quarter of a mile, the greatest unbeliever must have been converted. The man who, while he looked on the expensive machine, thanked his stars that he had more wisdom than to waste his money on such idle schemes, changed the expression of his features as the boat moved from the wharf and gained her speed: his complacent smile gradually stiffened into an expression of wonder.
Page 60 - ... larger, so as to be in the axis or centre of it : the small tube was open at both ends, and on this construction water could be poured into the large vessel to fill it, whilst the central tube was exposed to its temperature. Into this central tube I could insert the upper half of a syphon barometer, and fix it by a cork, the top of the narrow tube also being corked : thus the effect of any temperature under 212° could be ascertained, the depression of the mercurial column being known by the...
Page 60 - Having procured a tin tube of 4 inches in diameter and 2 feet long, with a circular plate of the same soldered to one end having a round hole in the centre, like the tube of a reflecting telescope, I got another smaller tube of the same length soldered into the larger, so as to be in the axis or centre of it : the small tube was open at both ends, and on this construction water could be poured into the large vessel to fill it, whilst the central tube was exposed to its temperature. Into this central...

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