Making People Illegal: What Globalization Means for Migration and Law

Couverture
Cambridge University Press, 14 avr. 2008 - 216 pages
This book examines the relationship between illegal migration and globalization. Under the pressures of globalizing forces, migration law is transformed into the last bastion of sovereignty. This explains the worldwide crackdown on extra-legal migration and informs the shape this crackdown is taking. It also means that migration law reflects key facets of globalization and addresses the central debates of globalization theory. This book looks at various migration law settings, asserting that differing but related globalization effects are discernable at each location. The "core samples" interrogated in the book are drawn from refugee law, illegal labor migration, human trafficking, security issues in migration law, and citizenship law. Special attention is paid to the roles played by the European Union and the United States in setting the terms of global engagement. The book's conclusion considers what the rule of law contributes to transformed migration law.
 

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Table des matières

CHAPTER THREE
29
CHAPTER FOUR
50
CHAPTER FIVE
69
CHAPTER SIX
93
suspensionofnormaloperationsoflawforexamplethroughthedeviceofdeclaring
115
CHAPTER SEVEN
119
Table 72
125
Table 78 Canada refugee admissions
129
for ensuring that women migrate in defined relationships of dependence
131
CHAPTEREIGHT
142
US 7 billion43 Major defense contractors were involved in bidding
155
CHAPTER NINE
169
points to the relationship between sovereignty and the rule of
175

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Page 2 - Every citizen of the Union shall have the right to move and reside freely within the territory of the Member States...

À propos de l'auteur (2008)

Catherine Dauvergne is Professor and Canada Research Chair in Migration Law for the University of British Columbia Faculty of Law. She is author of the book Humanitarianism Identity and Nation: Migration Laws of Australia and Canada and is editor of Jurisprudence for an Interconnected Globe. She has also published articles in the Modern Law Review, Theoretical Inquiries in Law, Social and Legal Studies, the International Journal of Refugee Law, Sydney Law Review, Melbourne Law Review, Res Publica, and the Osgoode Hall Law Journal, amongst others.

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