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Complaints from without,

222
Constitution of the Students of Bethany College,

286
onsumption,

563
Conversations at the Carleton House. Family Culture, 49, 119, 171

217, 265, 289, 312, 467, 518
Converting Influence,

18, 113, 212, 335, 400, 52:
Corinthian Spirit,

69
Crisis in Britain,

743
Critioism on 1st Peter, 1st chap , 7th verse,

164

363
129

295
65, 124

233
514

84
430

Death of Christ,
Debates in Churches, unlawfulness of,
Debt, Sermon on,
Demonology,
Did Judas eat the Lord's Supper,
Discourse by P. S. Fall, extract from,
Disobedience to Parents,
Datch History.
EARTHQUAKES and their terrible effects,
Education,

New Series,
Efficacy of Infant Baptism,
Elder Philip C. Montague,
Elmore, D. W.,
Embarrassed Brother,
Enjoyment of Religion.-Experience of Eusebia,
Errata,
Essay on Parables,
Evangelist wanted,

Prospectus of,
Excursion into Onio,
Extracts from Minutes,

227

572
13, 78, 155, 157

235

567
155, 157

383
308, 385, 544

288, 383
350, 387

131
288
452
378

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Fall's School, Bishop P. S.,

284
Family Culture.-Conversations at the Carleton House, 49, 119, 171

217, 265, 289, 342, 467, 518
Family Testament,

528
Female Collegiate Institute,

48
Five Facts,

572
Flowers, Hymn to,

384
Free Masons and Odd Fellows,

557

1

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HEXLEY's Appeal, Elder,
Humble Beginnings,
Hygeia Female Atheneum,
Hymn to the Flowers,

493

5
144
384

IMMERSION—Calvin's testimony in favor of,

189
Import of the term Redemption-Ransom,

311
Impostor,

191
Incest, according to the Presbyterian General Assembly, 329
Influence of the Spirit, Discussion on, 72, 75, 253, 256, 412, 414

Kind Words,
Knowledge, Attainment of,

is Power,

240
142
164

556

Love of God unchangeable,
Luther, weighty words of,

143

MANUAL Labor System of Education,

155, 157
Mechanic,

143
Meeting of Preachers,

525
Millennium,

480
Miracle,

228
Montague, Elder Philip T., to Elder Thomas M. Henley, 567
Moral bearings of Geology,

197,270
Mormonism,

190, 358, 418, 460, 497, 538
Mystery of Mesmerism and Somnambulism explained,

139
M vay James, Trial of,

282
News from the Churches, 38, 89, 141, 186, 236, 273, 320, 376, 431

475, 527, 558
New Map,

143
Newton Female Institute,
Notes on a late Tour,

446, 502
Note to M. Winans,

95

OBITUARY,

192, 324, 432, 527,572
Odd Fellows and Free Masons,

557
Old Gem,

96
Our Colleges,

190
Owe no man any thing,

178
PARENTAL Example,

140
Past, the Present, and the Future,

85
Peck, Elder J. M.,

72, 253, 412
Plea of the American Home Missionary Society,

422
Police Regulations of the Students of Bethany College,

283
Popery, Aspirations of,

496
Population of the United States,

429
Power of Prejudice,

523
Prayer,

179
Preface,

3

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RAINBOW,
Redemption-Ransom-import of the term,
Reflection,
Reformation, scriptural,
Review of Beecher's article on the import of baptidso,
Rhemish Testament,

528
311
142

407
159, 201, 247

132

SAVANNAH River Association,
School, Bishop P. S. Fall'8,
Scientific,
Sermon on Debt,
Signs of the Times,
Sin unto Death and the Sin against the Holy Spirit,
Solemnity in Public Worship,
Spirit of God,
Stevenson, Rev. W. W., an Address delivered by,
Success of the Gospel,
Synagogue Worship,

180
284
571
295
177
181

85
533, 550

481
570
342

TABLE-Talk,
Temperance,

Societies,
Thoughts in undress,
Traveller,
Trial of James M.Vay,
VARIOUS Notices,
WEIGHTY Words of Luther,
Winans M., Note to,

Reply to,

330
167,370

93
565
491
282

47

143

95
125

PREFACE.

We now commence the twentieth volume of our editorial labors.Through the kind providence of our heavenly Father, not one month in so many years has passed without our regular issue of a new mis. sionary. At the close of the present volume we shall have issued more than a million of monthly numbers. These, of course, have done, and are doing, something in the great moral change which is incessantly going forward in this community. This, however, is but a single item in our editorial labors,

And when we think of the sermons that are preached—the discussions that are in progress--the tracts that are issued, and the volumes that are circulated on the great subjects of religion and morality, wo are no little astonished at the labors, and means, and instrumentalities that are requisite to the demands of society in this great moral regeneration now advancing with every pulse of life in every part of the civilized world.

The human mind seems to need the incessant stimulus of new ideas, of thought, and motive 10 raise it above the ordinary level of mere animal enjoyment. Man is naturally indolent, and requires some impulse from without to rouse him into action. His appetites and passions will sometimes do this; but the range of their activities is very limitted compared with that of his intellectual and moral powers. The Press, together with the facile and abundant means of social intercourse, keep the energies of all employed, who have either a mind to perceive, or a heart to feel the important duties of human life and the high destiny to which man is born under the reign of the Messiah.

The constant developments of the Periodical Literary, and Religious Press, when well conducted, minister continuous edification and comfort to the intelligent, and exert a powerful and happy influence in the formation of human character, and in elevating the standard of public taste and moral excellence.

If there be any one subject more than another the peculiar burthen of this age, it is the subject of Education in its various departments, and in all the ways and means of its advancement. The civilized world is just awaking to this subject. It is about commencing one grand crusade against ignorance and vice-against irreligion and profanity. It is now a demonstrated proposition that the only effectual preventive of atheism, anarchy, and misrule, is a rational and moral education. Morals neglected, and intellectual development is a public calamity.

If, then, the volume for the year 1842 be distinguished by any one subject more than another, it is intended that it shall be for its devotion to the subject of Education, domestic, scholastic, and ecclesiastic.

Next to this is the subject of clesiastic Organization. Within the whole precincts of the progressive reformation of this age, there is nothing more at fault than the whole affair of church organization. We have the words 'co-operation,' 'organization,' and 'order' in con stant employment; but who has evinced a practical understanding of thom in reference to the public interests of a great community! The calls upon us for a full investigation of this subject are imperious as well as numerous.

It must have its full share of our attention in the present volume.

The signs of the times are also more and more imposing. That wo are approaching some great crisis in human affairs is daily becoming more and more the persuasion of many intelligent and devout professors. These, of course, together with disquisitions on Prophecy, will still command portion of our attention. But the past is the best pledge we can give for the future. We annually learn to promise less, and daily study the philosophy of doing, rather than of saying what we intend to do.

A. CAMPBELL

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