The Sad Comedy of El_dar Riazanov: An Introduction to Russia's Most Popular Filmaker

Couverture
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 2003 - 283 pages
Russia's funniest and most popular films are the work of Èl'dar Riazanov, a director whose light, lyrical tales of love lost and found have garnered audiences of over one hundred million. Although Western scholars have largely ignored Riazanov's oeuvre in favour of more serious filmmakers, no director in Russia has been so loved by both the public (openly) and politicians (covertly). His early comedies mapped the relations between society and socialism, allowing him to create a radically apolitical art of kindness and kindred spirits. David MacFadyen investigates what made Riazanov's films so wildly popular and what – if any – relationship that popularity had to Soviet policy. Using the works of Deleuze, Lacan, and Kristeva, MacFadyen looks at how Riazanov's films relate to society, audience demand, and Soviet politics. In more than twenty love stories that have precious little to do with statecraft, Soviet or otherwise, Riazanov captures the willful inclusiveness of socialist culture.
 

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Table des matières

I
3
II
19
III
45
IV
47
V
78
VI
95
VII
97
VIII
112
XII
169
XIII
171
XIV
195
XV
197
XVI
217
XVII
235
XVIII
241
XIX
271

IX
133
X
135
XI
149

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À propos de l'auteur (2003)

David MacFadyen is a professor of Slavic languages and literatures at UCLA. He has written extensively on Soviet popular culture and is the author of The Sad Comedy of Èl'dar Riazanov and several books on Joseph Brodsky.

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