Christian Education in the Dark Ages (A.D. 476-A.D. 1100)

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Cathedral Library Association, 1898 - 60 pages
 

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Page 60 - ... in no age, perhaps, did Germany possess more learned and virtuous churchmen of the episcopal order than in the latter half of the tenth, and beginning of the eleventh, century.
Page 37 - ... buildings having been of wood before his time. In a word, he comprehended in the greatness of his mind the whole of government and all its parts at once, and, what is most difficult to human frailty, was at the same time sublime and minute.
Page 14 - Cofnioyraphicus de Natura Locorum, is a species of physical geography. I have found in it considerations on the dependence of temperature concurrently on latitude and elevation, and on the effect of different angles of incidence of the sun's rays in heating the ground, which have excited my surprise.'* Jourdain, another modern critic, says, ' whether we consider him as a theologian or a philosopher.
Page 59 - When the supposed authority of Asser is put out of court, the Alfredian legend, even in its simplest and least elaborate form, cannot be traced further back than the Polychronicon...
Page 18 - The severity was no doubt encouraged by the theory that the devil was in the hearts of boys, and could be got out only by flogging. In many monasteries all the boys were periodically flogged as a kind of general atonement for sins past and possible. Even so late as the fourteenth century we find that the ceremony of introducing a schoolmaster to his office (incepting in grammar) was presenting him with a palmer (ferule) and rod, and requiring him to flog a boy publicly. "Then shall the Bedell purvay...
Page 58 - Cataldus, founded in 640. Whilst almost the whole of Europe was desolated by war, peaceful Ireland, free from the invasions of external foes, opened to the lovers of learning and piety a welcome asylum. The strangers, who visited the island, not only from the...
Page 10 - This curriculum,! derived from the earlier ages of heathen philosophy, was transferred to the use of the Church on the authority of St. Augustine, who in his de Ordine considers it to be the fitting and sufficient preparation for theological learning. It is hardly necessary to refer to the history of its formation ; we are told how Pythagoras prescribed the study of arithmetic, music, and geometry ; how Plato and Aristotle insisted on grammar and music, which, with gymnastics, were the substance...
Page 26 - We exhort you, therefore, not only not to neglect the study of letters, but to apply yourselves thereto with perseverance and with that humility which is well pleasing to God; so that you may be able to penetrate with greater ease and certainty the mysteries of the Holy Scriptures.
Page 11 - Ordine considers it to be the fitting and sufficient preparation for theological learning. It is hardly necessary to refer to the history of its formation ; we are told how Pythagoras prescribed the study of arithmetic, music, and geometry; how Plato and Aristotle insisted on grammar and music, which, with gymnastics, were the substance of Greek education; how Seneca speaks, though not as approving, of grammar, music, geometry, and astronomy, as the matter of education in his own day; and how Philo,...
Page 55 - ... of those who gave them life to accept at their bidding the course in which that life was to run. They were brought into the sanctuary, spoke by the mouth of their parents, as at the font, put out their tiny hand for the sacred corporal to be wrapped round it, received the cowl, and took their place as monks in the monastic community. In the first ages of the Benedictine Order, these children were placed on a level with their oldest brethren. They took precedence according to their date of...

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