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vishing and astonishing Scene would open to us! It is at best but a little Portion we now know of the Works of God; and yet eveni the partial and imperfect Views which we have of thefe Things furnish á noble Entertainment to a pious Nlind. How delightful is it to survey, as far as we are able the several Parts of the Creation, and then 10 ascend above them all to the supreme universal Cause, crying out with a devout Admiration, Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive Glory, and Honour, and Power ; for taču bast created all Things, and for thy Plensure they are, and were created. Rev.

iv. II.

Let us look back in our Thoughts to that Point of the immense Duration when this material World was formed, and here let us represent to our Minds a vast univerfal Void, and then behold the grand and ftupendous Fabric rising, at the all-powerful Word of God out Non-existence into Being, and into tlie beautiful Order in which we now see it; the more we consider this, the more we shall be swallowed

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in Aftonishment: For, though it doth not imply a Contradiction to cause Things to exist which had no Existence before, yet this is what we can form no Idea of, who are only accustomed to behold Things made

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out of pre-existent Materials. And therefore we should, when we reflect on this, turn all our Thoughts into Reverence and Admiration of that incomprehensible Being, who only Spake, and it was done, Pf.xxxiii. 9. He commanded, and they were created. Ps.

The more to affect our Minds let us take a general View of the Greatness and vast Extent, of the Number and Variety, of the admirable Order and wise Contrivance of the Works of Creation.

First, Let us take a View of the Greatnefs and vast Extent of God's Works of Creation. To them may be justly applied those Words of the Psalmist, The Works of the Lord are great. Many of the Works of Nature, which are really the Works of God, even in this lower World, have á Grandeur in them which strikes us with Astonishment. Such are the lofty Mountains that seem to scale the Sky, those stupendous Heaps of Stone which in many Parts of the Earth rise and spread to an amazing Height and Bulk, and are stretched out in Length through many Reģions ; and yet how small and inconsiderable are these compared with the whole Earth, this huge and ponderous Globe, which contains such a prodigious Mass and Quantity of Matter! But, if we pursue our Inquiries Vol. III. E

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terraqueous Globe with the other parts of this wide-extended System, it may not unfitly be likened to a small round Ball hanging scarce discernible amidst the unmeasurable Spaces that surround it. To those Beings which are placed in very distant Parts of the Universe it appeareth at best no bigger than the Planets do to us; and probably there are many so far removed from our Earth, às not to be capable of discerning.it at all; fo that they cannot know by their own Observation, that there is such a Spot in the Creation. The fixed Stars that twinkle in our View, and which appear to us like so many minute glittering Spangles in the Firmament, are, by the Consent of the ablest Astronomers, Bodies of wonderous Bulk, much exceeding this earthly Globe in Magnitude. And how great the Number of them is none can tell : For the Stars that come within our View are but'a Part, and perhaps a small Part, of those that are dispersed throughout the vast Expanie. Many of the heavenly Orbs, which cannot be discerned by the naked Eye, have in these latter Times been discovered by the Help of Telescopes; and there are probably many more which are removed at fo immense a Distance, that no human Eye on Earth, though aided with all the Helps of Art, shall ever be able to get a Glimpse of them. Thus there are as it were innumerable Worlds, extending one beyồnd another; and, when we endeavour to turn our Thoughts this Way; we foon lose ourselves in the Immensity of Space, which exceedeth the utmost Flight of human Imagination, And thould not this general View of the Greatness and wide Extent of the Creation of God fill our Minds with a delightful Astonishment ? It should naturally lead us to reason after this Manner: How im. mense; how incomprehensibly great, is that glorious Being, by whosé Word the Heavens 'were made; and all the Hoft of them by the Breath of bis Mouth; who is represented in the noble Language of the Prophet; as meting out the Heavens with a Span, and whom Heaven; the Heaven of Heavens, cannot contain !

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Secondly, Let us consider not only the Greatness but the Number and Variety of the Works of God in the Creation. And, considered in this View, they must needs give Pleasure to a religious Mind. They are so many and various, that they are only to be fully known and comprehended by the great Author of Nature. If we take a Survey even of this Earth, which is that Part of the Creation we are best ac

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quainted with, we are astonished at the Multiplicity of Things which offer them selves to our Observation. No human Mind can pursue inanimate Matter through all it's various surprising Transformations. It putteth on numberless different Appearances, and by it's manifold Combinations, and the Motions imprefied upon it, is diversified beyond what the most active and enlarged Imagination is able to conceive. Who can undertake to enumerate the Fossils of various Kinds, Stones, Metals, Minerals, that are treasured up in the Bowels of the Earth ; or the Vegetables which spring up out of it's Bosom in.

inconceivable Quantities, and adorn it's Suri face ; the Trees in their several Species

from the lowly Shrub to the statelieft Oak or Cedar ; the Herbs and Plants of such different Forms and Virtue; the several Sorts of Grass and Grain, and the Flowers fo inexpreflibly various, and exquisitely beautiful and pleasing !

If we next turn our Views to the animal Part of the Creation, the whole Earth feemeth to be replenished with living Creatures, and every Clod is swarming with · Life; - no Mortal is able to compute the Insects of various Tribes, many of them fo minute, as not to be difcerned by the naked Eye : And perhaps there are yet

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