The Percheron Horse

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O. Judd, 1868 - 100 pages
 

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Page 19 - The essential point is to prove that there was, at that period, a native race ; and if the extraordinary life formerly led there — if the aspect of the country, which must have been always fertile — if the historical inductions do not prove it, the universal tradition of the whole country should not leave us in any doubt in respect to the fact. Let us then take no account of the silence of historians. This silence is no proof of the non-existence of the Percheron. Most of these writers were...
Page 51 - The Percheron shows a very great analogy by his coat, conformation, character of race, mild disposition, and endurance, to the Arab, of which he seems to be the son, notwithstanding certain differences, the result of time, climate, and region in which he is bred and in which he lives. I have said that the Percheron exhibits in common with the Arab numerous marks of a common parentage and relationship; these marks are very obvious. A Percheron, a true Percheron...
Page 18 - Courseroult ; these are liistorical facts which have their importance. Like chronicles, it is true, exist for other provinces — for Limousin, for Navarre, for Auvergne (the land of noble horses), also for Brittany and Maine ; but in the latter not the least sign of Eastern blood is perceptible. The fact is, the crusaders from all the French provinces naturally brought back with them more or less of the Eastern blood, which they had learned to appreciate on the...
Page 6 - It is particularly valuable for its astonishing precocity, and produces by its work, as a two-year-old, more than the cost of its feed and keep. Indeed, it loves, and shows a real aptness for labor, which is the lot of all. It knows neither the whims of bad humor nor nervous excitement. It bears for man, the companion of its labors, an innate confidence, and expresses to him a gentle familiarity, the fruit of an education for many generations in the midst of his family. Women and children, from whose...
Page 15 - The type intermediary between these two, partaking of the one by its lightness, and of the other by its muscular force. The latter is the most numerous, but it has much degenerated of late years ; and there is a tendency to its disappearance since the post-coach service, which formed it, has gradually given way to other means of conveyance. It has style, although the head is rather large and long; nostrils well...

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