Archæology of the United States: Or, Sketches, Historical and Bibliographical, of the Progress of Information and Opinion Respecting Vestiges of Antiquity in the United States

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Smithsonian institution, 1856 - 168 pages
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Page vi - The following are some of the subjects which may be embraced in the reports: I. PHYSICAL CLASS. 1. Physics, including astronomy, natural philosophy, chemistry, and meteorology. 2. Natural history, including botany, zoology, geology, &c. 3. Agriculture. 4. Application of science to arts. II. MORAL AND POLITICAL CLASS. 5. Ethnology, including particular history, comparative philology, antiquities, &c.
Page 28 - Tingitana with this inscription, " we are they who fled from the face of Joshua the robber, the son of Nane.
Page v - Some of the reports may be published annually, others at longer intervals, as the income of the Institution or the changes in the branches of knowledge may indicate. 2. The reports are to be prepared by collaborators eminent in the different branches of knowledge. 3. Each collaborator to be furnished with the journals and publications, domestic and foreign, necessary to the compilation of his report; to be paid a certain sum for his labors, and...
Page iii - FOR THE INCREASE AND DIFFUSION OF KNOWLEDGE AMONG MEN.
Page v - The emphasis upon publications as a means of diffusing knowledge was expressed by the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. In his formal plan for the Institution, Joseph Henry articulated a program that included the following statement: "It is proposed to publish a series of reports, giving an account of the new discoveries in science, and of the changes made from year to year in all branches of knowledge not strictly professional.
Page v - Ethnological researches, particularly with reference to the different races of men in North America ; also, explorations and accurate surveys of the mounds and other remains of the ancient people of our country.
Page 110 - The process by which nature restores the forest to its original state, after being once cleared, is extremely slow. The rich lands of the West are, indeed, soon covered again ; but the character of the growth is entirely different, and continues so for a long period. In several places upon the Ohio, and upon the farm which I occupy, clearings were made in the first settlement of the country, and subsequently abandoned...
Page 27 - Here we came to a nation of Indians remarkably white, and whose hair was of a reddish color, at least, mostly so.
Page iv - The volumes of the memoirs to be exchanged for the Transactions of literary and scientific societies, and copies to be given to all the colleges, and principal libraries, in this country. One part ~of the remaining copies may be offered for sale; and the other carefully preserved, to form complete sets of the work, to supply the demand from new institutions.
Page 112 - TRAVELS IN SIBERIA : including Excursions northwards, down the Obi, to the Polar Circle, and southwards to the Chinese Frontier. By ADOLPH ERMAN. Translated by WD COOLEY, Esq. Author of " The History of Maritime and Inland Discovery ;

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